Monday, February 5, 2007

Jewish Nobel Prize Winners - Physics

(from answers.com)

Alexei Alexeevich Abrikosov, Russia, for pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids (Jewish mother)
Zhores Alferov, Russia, (Jewish mother)
Hans Bethe, US, (Jewish mother)
Felix Bloch, Swiss and US, for his development of new methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements and discoveries in connection therewith
Niels Bohr, Denmark, for his quantum model of the atom (Jewish mother)
Max Born, Germany, UK and US, for his fundamental research in quantum mechanics, especially for his statistical interpretation of the wavefunction
Georges Charpak, France
Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, France,(Tunisian-Jewish parents)
Leon Neil Cooper, US,
Albert Einstein, German, later US, for theory of the photoelectric effect
Richard P. Feynman, US, for their fundamental work in quantum electrodynamics, with deep-ploughing consequences for the physics of elementary particles (Even though he has Jewish ancestry, he refused to be included in a list of "Jewish Nobel laureates" and "Jewish scientists" [1].)
James Franck, Germany, for their discovery of the laws governing the impact of an electron upon an atom
Ilya Frank, Russia, (Jewish father)
Jerome Isaac Friedman, US, for their pioneering investigations concerning deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons and bound neutrons, which have been of essential importance for the development of the quark model in particle physics
Dennis Gabor, Hungary, for his invention and development of the holographic method
Murray Gell-Mann, US, for his contributions and discoveries concerning the classification of elementary particles and their interactions"
Vitaly Lazarevich Ginzburg, Russia, for pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids
Donald Arthur Glaser, US, for the invention of the bubble chamber
Sheldon Lee Glashow, US, for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current
Roy Glauber, U.S. physicist, Nobel Prize (2005)
David Gross, US, for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction
Robert Hofstadter, US, for his pioneering studies of electron scattering in atomic nuclei and for his thereby achieved discoveries concerning the structure of the nucleons
Brian David Josephson, UK, for his theoretical predictions of the properties of a supercurrent through a tunnel barrier, in particular those phenomena which are generally known as the Josephson effect
Lev Davidovich Landau, Russia, for his pioneering theories for condensed matter, especially liquid helium
Leon Max Lederman, US, for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino
David Lee, US,
Gabriel Lippmann, France, for his method of reproducing colours photographically based on the phenomenon of interference
Albert Abraham Michelson, US, for his optical precision instruments and the spectroscopic and metrological investigations carried out with their aid
Ben Roy Mottelson, US and Denmark,for the discovery of the connection between collective motion and particle motion in atomic nuclei and the development of the theory of the structure of the atomic nucleus based on this connection
Douglas Osheroff, US, (Jewish father)
Wolfgang Pauli, (one non-Jewish grandparent)
Arno Allan Penzias, US, for their discovery of cosmic microwave background radiation
Martin Lewis Perl, for the discovery of the tau lepton
David Politzer, US, for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction
Isidor Isaac Rabi, US, for his resonance method for recording the magnetic properties of atomic nuclei
Frederick Reines, US,
Burton Richter, US, for their pioneering work in the discovery of a heavy elementary particle of a new kind
Arthur Schawlow, US, (Jewish father)
Melvin Schwartz, US, for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino
Julian Schwinger, US, for his work on quantum electrodynamics
Emilio Segre, Italy and US, for discovery of antiproton
Jack Steinberger, US, for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino
Otto Stern, US, for his contribution to the development of the molecular ray method and his discovery of the magnetic moment of the proton
Steven Weinberg, US, for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current
Eugene Wigner, US, Nuclear Engineering

No comments: